Archive for the ‘Architecture’ Category

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Driving by the Milwaukee Art Museum on Saturday morning, the contrast of the open soleil against a brilliant blue, cloud-streaked sky was more than I could bear. The Wabi Sabi staff car made a sharp unplanned right, nearly missing the entrance, but was rewarded with an unlimited view of the building, sans visitors and assorted cars.

Of course, I ended up zeroing in on the wings as they stood poised against the sky, like impossibly graceful birds.

Windhover Hall, a mind-boggling component of the Milwaukee Art Museum complex, is the portion of the museum visible above made up of blue-tinted glass. The Burke Brise Soleil is a moveable sunscreen with a wingspan of 217 feet that fits over Windhover Hall and opens and closes twice a day. Both the Hall and the Soleil are part of the museum campus called The Quadracci Pavilion and were designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava.  The entire structure is an incredibly arresting sight, poised on the shore of Lake Michigan and often appearing on the verge of taking flight.

For views of Windhover Hall from the inside the building, check out these earlier posts:

https://wabisabiphotography.wordpress.com/2012/08/07/milwaukee-art-museum-interior-shots/

https://wabisabiphotography.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/soft-interior/

Three Lakes, Wisconsin. A gallery of nine detail shots.

The interior of this Art Deco gem should come with a trigger warning for folks who are inclined to swoon over lines and arches and the play of light and shadows.

 

 

I’ll admit that I was looking for architectural grandeur with this bridge, the cathedral-like quality to be found looking dead-center through the piers. Instead, I was most taken by the qualities of the concrete, with its subtle cracking and vague hieroglyphic markings.

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And, about the aforementioned barges that work the Mississippi twenty-four/seven: when you are anchored on a sandbar for the night, the sight of one of these massive vessels sliding by is all kinds of other-worldly. They are remarkably quiet and you can only stand on the deck of your little craft, mouth slightly a-gape and  contemplate their lights slicing through the silence of the velvet-black night.  Three shots of a passing barge in the slideshow below

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Six images

The abandoned farm around the corner. There’s a tear-down in progress, though I’ve never seen anyone working at the site.

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I think these last two ladder shots have a little Wyeth vibe going for them.

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Seven images

Last of the shots from my foggy morning walk to the Wabi Sabi farm:

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I thought this image should stand alone.

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Same time and place as last week’s foggy farm posts, different building. Five images.

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I like this last picture: a selfie shot into the window of today’s building. I didn’t plan it, but I will have to say it puts me in mind of the painting The Arnolfini Portrait  by the Dutch painter, van Eyck, where each component of the painting carries symbolic/iconic weight. Here I am, face obscured by my favorite camera and reflected in a smudged and dirty glass, framed by old and cracking brick. Instead of roses or flowers, the scene is graced by a spray of thorny brown thistles. Interpretive possibilities abound!

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I believe this picture should be titled “Exceedingly Prickly Wench” and it would certainly reflect my current frame of mind quite accurately.  However, I am on my way to northern Wisconsin for a couple of days where I will hang out with my friend,  Karen, we will revisit the scenes of our misspent youth and with any luck at all, we will have the chance to poke around the Abandoned Sawmill. (Yes! Please! Yes!)  All of that…plus a couple of Old-Fashioneds in the bar at the Gateway…and the current annoyances and demands of the world should appear a lot less thorny.